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Do poetry books still do well today?

 
Nickie85
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There are a few I can think of off the top of my head that were done by social media type people and they seemed to have tanked and got really bad reviews. I am wondering if poetry books sell well today. I feel like in most cases, they don't. I think you need to be very established to make sales in this kind of genre of reading. Do you think poetry books still do well today or is it a failing book genre most should avoid? 

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Topic starter Posted : 09/02/2021 3:04 pm
Nancymac
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I think the old poets said it all and it is hard to create a poem as good as the masters, to me it is like trying to reinvent the wheel, but that is my opinion.

I remember a long time ago you would go to one of the coffee houses and someone would read a poem and then discuss it, but I really think that time is passed.

You might have a niche, where some people write for greeting card companies, that is a thought?

What do you think?

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Posted : 11/02/2021 2:39 pm
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Nickie85
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Posted by: @nancymac

I think the old poets said it all and it is hard to create a poem as good as the masters, to me it is like trying to reinvent the wheel, but that is my opinion.

I remember a long time ago you would go to one of the coffee houses and someone would read a poem and then discuss it, but I really think that time is passed.

You might have a niche, where some people write for greeting card companies, that is a thought?

What do you think?

Actually, when I was younger, I was told I should get into greeting card writing since I was good at short poems and meaningful messages. I looked into it but was never able to figure out where to go with it. Do you know where to find more information on it? I would love to sell some of my older work.

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Topic starter Posted : 12/02/2021 6:34 pm
Nancymac
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1. Blue Mountain Arts

Poet-artist duo Susan Polis Schutz and Stephen Schutz founded Blue Mountain Arts nearly 50 years ago. Their goal? Help people express their thoughts in, well, thoughtful ways.

Get familiar with the content by checking out the company’s Facebook page. You can find the writing guidelines on their website, too. Pay is not mentioned.

2. Calypso Cards

You might have seen some of Calypso’s products in specialty stores in the U.S. or Canada. The company encompasses several brands, including Selfish Kitty.

It produces some pretty sassy material, including a personal favorite: “We’re going to celebrate your birthday in style this year. I’ve already got a box of wine chilling in the fridge.”

If you have a cheeky, dry humorous voice, comb through the other cards — maybe even chuckle — because Selfish Kitty is accepting submissions for all occasions.

3. Noble Works

Need a greeting card featuring Santa getting a back tat? Yeah, NobleWorks Cards has got you covered.

Even more funny? The slogan on the site reads, “Make American Greet Again.” (OK, I laughed.)

Anyway, these cards are funny, unique and risqué. You can join in and submit art, cartoons or writing.

Start by entering your information on Noble Works’ submission page. Expect to get an email outlining all of the criteria after. Pay varies, so be sure to ask.

4. Oatmeal Studios

You’ve probably seen Oatmeal Studios’ cards on the shelves of popular retailers. They feature colorful cartoons paired with a silly saying.

Take, for example, a birthday card with a cartoon of a horse reading “50 Shades of Hay.” On the inside? “It’s your birthday — Horse around!” A horse with a toothy grin holds a whip.

Think you’ve got the right amount of sass? A bunch of submission details is outlined on the site, although the pay isn’t mentioned.

Rejected card ideas are, however, and include: “PUNS, GROSS IDEAS, MEAN IDEAS, LENGTHY POETRY or PROSE, NARROWLY FOCUSED IDEAS. (ie: new baby for quintuplets)”

5. RSVP

This line of greeting cards, a division of Sellers Publishing, is self-described as “fresh, funny, sweet, and sugary mixed with a bit of sass & edge.”

RSVP has a card for any occasion. It might be pretty, or it might be silly. Either way, RSVP seems to really value its contributors: “We work with artists and writers all over the globe, which keeps our content fresh, varied, and relevant. They are the core to the success of our card line.”

If you’re an artist, find all the information you need on this page. If you’re a writer, there’s a page for you, too.

As far as pay, it’s not specified. A representative said it varies by “industry standard.”

6. Shade Tree Greetings

This greeting card company has a line of cards called “Actual Pictures.”

You guessed it — these cards feature actual pictures, submitted by you. And you don’t even have to be good at photography. The company wants your old photos — ones from the ‘40s, ‘50s, ‘60s, ‘70s, or ‘80s. Photos can be black and white or color.

They’ll probably be turned into something funny, so don’t submit anything you’re super sentimentally attached to.

If your photo is accepted, you’ll receive a $100 gift card to Cool Funny Gifts along with 12 cards with your photo. (If you’re not interested in a cool or funny gift, you could always try selling the gift card.)

Find all the details to submit online.

7. Viabella

These pretty cards are less crude and sweeter.  They do, however, feature some of my favorite phrases, like “Shut the front door!” and “Holy Macaroni!”

Viabella accepts art and writing. Teri Desautels, the line and verse director, didn’t specify pay, but did say: “Payment can vary quite a bit depending on the submission type and several pieces. Typically art earns more than writing; humor writing pays more than traditional writing.”

You can find all the details in the submission guidelines.

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Posted : 12/02/2021 6:56 pm
Nickie85 liked
Nickie85
(@nickie85)
Member
Writer’s Assistant
Posted by: @nancymac

1. Blue Mountain Arts

Poet-artist duo Susan Polis Schutz and Stephen Schutz founded Blue Mountain Arts nearly 50 years ago. Their goal? Help people express their thoughts in, well, thoughtful ways.

Get familiar with the content by checking out the company’s Facebook page. You can find the writing guidelines on their website, too. Pay is not mentioned.

2. Calypso Cards

You might have seen some of Calypso’s products in specialty stores in the U.S. or Canada. The company encompasses several brands, including Selfish Kitty.

It produces some pretty sassy material, including a personal favorite: “We’re going to celebrate your birthday in style this year. I’ve already got a box of wine chilling in the fridge.”

If you have a cheeky, dry humorous voice, comb through the other cards — maybe even chuckle — because Selfish Kitty is accepting submissions for all occasions.

3. Noble Works

Need a greeting card featuring Santa getting a back tat? Yeah, NobleWorks Cards has got you covered.

Even more funny? The slogan on the site reads, “Make American Greet Again.” (OK, I laughed.)

Anyway, these cards are funny, unique and risqué. You can join in and submit art, cartoons or writing.

Start by entering your information on Noble Works’ submission page. Expect to get an email outlining all of the criteria after. Pay varies, so be sure to ask.

4. Oatmeal Studios

You’ve probably seen Oatmeal Studios’ cards on the shelves of popular retailers. They feature colorful cartoons paired with a silly saying.

Take, for example, a birthday card with a cartoon of a horse reading “50 Shades of Hay.” On the inside? “It’s your birthday — Horse around!” A horse with a toothy grin holds a whip.

Think you’ve got the right amount of sass? A bunch of submission details is outlined on the site, although the pay isn’t mentioned.

Rejected card ideas are, however, and include: “PUNS, GROSS IDEAS, MEAN IDEAS, LENGTHY POETRY or PROSE, NARROWLY FOCUSED IDEAS. (ie: new baby for quintuplets)”

5. RSVP

This line of greeting cards, a division of Sellers Publishing, is self-described as “fresh, funny, sweet, and sugary mixed with a bit of sass & edge.”

RSVP has a card for any occasion. It might be pretty, or it might be silly. Either way, RSVP seems to really value its contributors: “We work with artists and writers all over the globe, which keeps our content fresh, varied, and relevant. They are the core to the success of our card line.”

If you’re an artist, find all the information you need on this page. If you’re a writer, there’s a page for you, too.

As far as pay, it’s not specified. A representative said it varies by “industry standard.”

6. Shade Tree Greetings

This greeting card company has a line of cards called “Actual Pictures.”

You guessed it — these cards feature actual pictures, submitted by you. And you don’t even have to be good at photography. The company wants your old photos — ones from the ‘40s, ‘50s, ‘60s, ‘70s, or ‘80s. Photos can be black and white or color.

They’ll probably be turned into something funny, so don’t submit anything you’re super sentimentally attached to.

If your photo is accepted, you’ll receive a $100 gift card to Cool Funny Gifts along with 12 cards with your photo. (If you’re not interested in a cool or funny gift, you could always try selling the gift card.)

Find all the details to submit online.

7. Viabella

These pretty cards are less crude and sweeter.  They do, however, feature some of my favorite phrases, like “Shut the front door!” and “Holy Macaroni!”

Viabella accepts art and writing. Teri Desautels, the line and verse director, didn’t specify pay, but did say: “Payment can vary quite a bit depending on the submission type and several pieces. Typically art earns more than writing; humor writing pays more than traditional writing.”

You can find all the details in the submission guidelines.

Thank you so much for all this information! I am going to check these places out. If I can turn this into a hobby to make a few extra bucks from, I would love that. I always thought greeting cards were overpriced for what they were but the messages and such make them worth it.

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Topic starter Posted : 15/02/2021 7:17 pm
Nancymac
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I hope it helps, anything to have more than one source of income, is always an idea.

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Posted : 15/02/2021 7:19 pm
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Junamo
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I feel like poetry books sell well based on word of mouth or status of it's author. I see a lot of famous poetry authors on instagram who do quite well for themselves.

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Posted : 19/02/2021 6:08 am
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Nickie85
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Posted by: @junamo

I feel like poetry books sell well based on word of mouth or status of it's author. I see a lot of famous poetry authors on instagram who do quite well for themselves.

I heard this and read about this as well. It seems to hold true. The only ones I see making sales either know someone or they already are someone.

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Topic starter Posted : 22/02/2021 2:02 pm
Junamo
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Posted by: @nickie85
Posted by: @junamo

I feel like poetry books sell well based on word of mouth or status of it's author. I see a lot of famous poetry authors on instagram who do quite well for themselves.

I heard this and read about this as well. It seems to hold true. The only ones I see making sales either know someone or they already are someone.

Yes! You need to build a name for yourself before anyone listens to your poetry (much). But you can also build a name while writing poetry.

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Posted : 23/02/2021 4:04 pm
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