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Song writing?

 
Nickie85
(@nickie85)
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I am speaking in terms of lyrics and not actual music. Has anyone ever written a song before? 

I loved poetry growing up and used to write it all the time. I dabbled with writing songs, sometimes I would rewrite popular ones or I would find music that has no lyrics and make my own to match it. I found it to be fun and relaxing. I can't sing for doggy doo-doo though so I never actually heard my songs sung before lol 

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Topic starter Posted : 08/01/2021 3:53 pm
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Jeremy
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If you love poetry, then you will be the best person to do music lyrics. Music is literally a poem with some background tune. I have never been good at rhyming, or finding rhyming words and arranging them in a manner that they will make sense. I would suggest you go ahead, you may turn out to be the best song writer around! 

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Posted : 09/01/2021 12:48 pm
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Simon
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Posted by: @nickie85

I am speaking in terms of lyrics and not actual music. Has anyone ever written a song before? 

I loved poetry growing up and used to write it all the time. I dabbled with writing songs, sometimes I would rewrite popular ones or I would find music that has no lyrics and make my own to match it. I found it to be fun and relaxing. I can't sing for doggy doo-doo though so I never actually heard my songs sung before lol 

Writing songs is a very lucrative niche if you know the right buttons to press. I would say if you are good in writing poems, they you are already halfway there, all you need is just some music lessons and how the rhymes can be made to sync with the tune. I would suggest you go for it. 

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Posted : 09/01/2021 4:47 pm
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Nickie85
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Has either of you had personal experience with writing songs? I am curious to see if anyone here has and what they did with those songs. I do wonder how song-writers make it into the big time these days. Most main-stream music is written by such a select few it seems. 

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Topic starter Posted : 09/01/2021 8:14 pm
I.write
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I have thought about writing songs, just for fun, but I have been too shy to actually attempt it. I have this feeling that I would not be able to write impactful lyrics. However, there is no harm to test the waters.

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Posted : 27/01/2021 2:54 pm
Elly
 Elly
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Posted by: @nickie85

Has either of you had personal experience with writing songs? I am curious to see if anyone here has and what they did with those songs. I do wonder how song-writers make it into the big time these days. Most main-stream music is written by such a select few it seems. 

I have, and I even put them up on SoundCloud, but now I don't remember what my username was because I didn't follow the calling of writing songs. 

Writing poetry is a good start, especially poetry that has strict meter: a ballad, for example, is not rigid but generally follows alternating iambic tetrameter and trimeter.

For example:

"But how shall I thee ken, Tam Lin, 
O how my true-love know?
Among so many unknown knights,
the like I never saw?"

From the Child Ballads, the title is "Tam Lin", and Anais Mitchell did a good cover/adaptation of this traditional song. The first and third line have eight syllables, and what I called an iamb is one beat of music that includes two syllables. That's why those lines are tetrameters, tetra meaning four, and eight syllables divided by the two beats per iamb is four. The second and fourth lines have six syllables, so they are trimeters because the two-syllable beats...the mathematics adds up. 

Another popular traditional ballad, "Bedlam Boys" (the a capella band called the Misbehavin' Maidens did the best cover of this song, in my opinion) doesn't match up exactly especially in the chorus, and so is a good demonstration of the versatility of music:

"For to see mad Tom of Bedlam
Ten thousand miles I'd travel
Mad Maudlin goes on dirty toes
For to save her shoes from gravel"

Instead of making it mathematical, which probably wasn't how these songs were composed in the first place, it gets into a beat of: first line, four beats; second line, three beats; third line, four beats; fourth line, three beats. 

The number of syllables gets squished and stretched out, but the rhythm is still in conformity to the essence of a ballad. 

After you get the rhythm, not necessarily the ballad rhythm but the rhythm of the song you're going to write, then once you live with that beat for a while...drumming your hands on the table to the rhythm of the words, or taking long walks even indoors just pacing around in the rhythm...then eventually your mind might get restless and begin giving you more exciting notes to accompany the rhythm. Then you have a melody! I hope you have a voice recorder on hand with plenty of memory and battery, for when you feel things getting exciting in that way.

The pop song format is slightly different, but I think that it follows the same principle. It doesn't have to be a "four-chord pop song", but usually there's going to be a verse portion that can tell the story or develop the emotion...and then there's the chorus portion that repeats the theme...and maybe, just maybe if you're feeling fancy, a pre-chorus that helps with the transition between the verse and chorus parts. And, if the muses bless you, then there'll be a bridge. 

In any case, I think finding the rhythm first makes the songwriting process very flexible...because whether randomly patched together a melody from the clips in your voice recorder first, or you wrote a poem first, it's the rhythm that unites the two. Most smartphones nowadays have a voice recorder. 

Identifying your musical influences can be helpful as well. At the time that I wrote my first song, I was listening to plenty of Emilie Autumn...and like every artist or performer, there are people that don't like her as a person and seem to be criticizing her work, and, I just have to stand by that I don't think it's bad and in fact enjoy it and personally think it's mostly really good music actually? So, once I familiarized myself with the sort of music she makes, I very deliberately tried to imagine a song "by Emilia Autumn" that Emilie Autumn hasn't written or performed yet.

So that was my first song, and...it sounds nothing like the style of Emilie Autumn, it sounds too much like the Japanese pop rock that I was also listening to a lot of (L'Arc en Ciel, Siam Shade, Luna Sea) but it was definitely a new song. 

But I also say be on the lookout for music that sort of defies formulation but still sounds pleasant. Lisa Loeb's "Stay" is really very chaotic in its structure, but I didn't notice it at the time it was on the radio, for example. 

And, note that my creative process will not be your creative process. Maybe you think up of melodies and lyrics at the same time like they grow up together. Or maybe you patch different songs together after working on different parts of what you thought were four different songs, but it turns out what you have from one song makes a good verse, and the other can be sampled for the pre-chorus, and the versus of a third can be the chorus for this stitched-together one...and it all works well together. That can happen. You can find your own process. 

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Posted : 28/01/2021 2:36 pm
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Junamo
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I do write a bit of songs as I play guitar, although never complete them. Just a few words here and there

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Posted : 29/01/2021 6:22 am
Nickie85
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Posted by: @elly
Posted by: @nickie85

Has either of you had personal experience with writing songs? I am curious to see if anyone here has and what they did with those songs. I do wonder how song-writers make it into the big time these days. Most main-stream music is written by such a select few it seems. 

I have, and I even put them up on SoundCloud, but now I don't remember what my username was because I didn't follow the calling of writing songs. 

Writing poetry is a good start, especially poetry that has strict meter: a ballad, for example, is not rigid but generally follows alternating iambic tetrameter and trimeter.

For example:

"But how shall I thee ken, Tam Lin, 
O how my true-love know?
Among so many unknown knights,
the like I never saw?"

From the Child Ballads, the title is "Tam Lin", and Anais Mitchell did a good cover/adaptation of this traditional song. The first and third line have eight syllables, and what I called an iamb is one beat of music that includes two syllables. That's why those lines are tetrameters, tetra meaning four, and eight syllables divided by the two beats per iamb is four. The second and fourth lines have six syllables, so they are trimeters because the two-syllable beats...the mathematics adds up. 

Another popular traditional ballad, "Bedlam Boys" (the a capella band called the Misbehavin' Maidens did the best cover of this song, in my opinion) doesn't match up exactly especially in the chorus, and so is a good demonstration of the versatility of music:

"For to see mad Tom of Bedlam
Ten thousand miles I'd travel
Mad Maudlin goes on dirty toes
For to save her shoes from gravel"

Instead of making it mathematical, which probably wasn't how these songs were composed in the first place, it gets into a beat of: first line, four beats; second line, three beats; third line, four beats; fourth line, three beats. 

The number of syllables gets squished and stretched out, but the rhythm is still in conformity to the essence of a ballad. 

After you get the rhythm, not necessarily the ballad rhythm but the rhythm of the song you're going to write, then once you live with that beat for a while...drumming your hands on the table to the rhythm of the words, or taking long walks even indoors just pacing around in the rhythm...then eventually your mind might get restless and begin giving you more exciting notes to accompany the rhythm. Then you have a melody! I hope you have a voice recorder on hand with plenty of memory and battery, for when you feel things getting exciting in that way.

The pop song format is slightly different, but I think that it follows the same principle. It doesn't have to be a "four-chord pop song", but usually there's going to be a verse portion that can tell the story or develop the emotion...and then there's the chorus portion that repeats the theme...and maybe, just maybe if you're feeling fancy, a pre-chorus that helps with the transition between the verse and chorus parts. And, if the muses bless you, then there'll be a bridge. 

In any case, I think finding the rhythm first makes the songwriting process very flexible...because whether randomly patched together a melody from the clips in your voice recorder first, or you wrote a poem first, it's the rhythm that unites the two. Most smartphones nowadays have a voice recorder. 

Identifying your musical influences can be helpful as well. At the time that I wrote my first song, I was listening to plenty of Emilie Autumn...and like every artist or performer, there are people that don't like her as a person and seem to be criticizing her work, and, I just have to stand by that I don't think it's bad and in fact enjoy it and personally think it's mostly really good music actually? So, once I familiarized myself with the sort of music she makes, I very deliberately tried to imagine a song "by Emilia Autumn" that Emilie Autumn hasn't written or performed yet.

So that was my first song, and...it sounds nothing like the style of Emilie Autumn, it sounds too much like the Japanese pop rock that I was also listening to a lot of (L'Arc en Ciel, Siam Shade, Luna Sea) but it was definitely a new song. 

But I also say be on the lookout for music that sort of defies formulation but still sounds pleasant. Lisa Loeb's "Stay" is really very chaotic in its structure, but I didn't notice it at the time it was on the radio, for example. 

And, note that my creative process will not be your creative process. Maybe you think up of melodies and lyrics at the same time like they grow up together. Or maybe you patch different songs together after working on different parts of what you thought were four different songs, but it turns out what you have from one song makes a good verse, and the other can be sampled for the pre-chorus, and the versus of a third can be the chorus for this stitched-together one...and it all works well together. That can happen. You can find your own process. 

Very insightful information! I never took my songwriting too seriously and often would use music I like the sound of and replace them with my own lyrics, so I would effectively hear the music and know the pitch of the sound but make the song my own. I had fun doing that a lot. 

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Topic starter Posted : 05/02/2021 5:53 pm
Elly liked
Nancymac
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Thank you for sharing, I am not musical in any way but songs have always played a big place in my life, to help solve trauma and to heal. Music to motivate and get a job completed that you did not really want to do. Once the music starts playing the mundane tasks go quickly to completion, if you concentrate on the music not the task.

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Posted : 07/02/2021 12:42 pm
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